Atrial Fibrillation– Atrial fibrillation (also called afib) is an irregular heartbeat (or heart rhythm), and is a major cause of strokes. Having afib increases your stroke risk by 500 percent. In addition, afib can lead to heart failure, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Today, more than 5 million Americans have afib, and by 2030, it’s expected that as many as 17 million people will have it. About 350,000 hospitalizations a year in the U.S. are attributed to afib. In addition, people over the age of 40 have a one in four chance of developing afib in their lifetime. The good news is that by spreading the word about afib, we can wipe out afib-related strokes throughout the world. Wear Red. www.stopafib.org

Childhood Cancer– Every two minutes a child is diagnosed with cancer. The average age of a child diagnosed with cancer is 6. Childhood cancer is diagnosed in all ages, from newborn infants to children and young adults. In 80% of kids with cancer, the cancer has already spread to other areas of the body by the time it is diagnosed. That’s why so many children with cancer need to begin treatment right away. Much of what we know about treating adult cancers has been learned from childhood cancer research. Because of the treatments they had as kids, by the time they’re in their 30s or 40s, more than 95% of childhood cancer survivors will have a chronic health problem and 80% will have severe or life-threatening conditions. Wear Yellow. www.curesearch.org

Gynecological Cancer – Women are encouraged to learn more about the prevention and detection of gynecological cancers before they become fatal. It is estimated that there will be about  22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed annually. Wear Teal. www.ovarian.org; www.foundationforwomenscancer.org;

Hunger Action– This month, a nationwide network of food banks unite to urge individuals to take action in their communities. The goal is to mobilize the public to act on behalf of the over 48 million Americans facing hunger. As individuals, charities, businesses and governments, we all have a role to play in getting food to those in need. Take action in support of domestic hunger relief. Wear Orange. www.feedingamerica.org; www.nutritioncare.org/maw

National Childhood Obesity – Since the 1970s, the rate of obesity has tripled in children, threatening far-reaching long-term effects on their health. About 1 in 6 (17%) kids in the United States has obesity. This awareness month provides a chance for all of us to learn more about this serious health condition. While there is no simple solution, there are many ways communities can support youth with their journey to good health. Wear Yellow. www.cdc.gov

National Substance Abuse and Mental Health Recovery – This month, thousands of treatment and recovery programs around the country celebrate their successes and share them with their neighbors, friends, and colleagues to educate the public about treatment, how it works, for whom, and why. The campaign highlights the benefits of treatment for not only the affected individual, but for their family, friends, workplace, and society as a whole. Behavioral health is essential to overall health: prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover to live a healthy ad rewarding life. Wear Purple. www.samhsa.hhs.gov

National Prostate Cancer Awareness – Efforts to increase awareness of prostate cancer and bolster research will help save lives, and commitment to fathers, brothers and sons will contribute to a brighter tomorrow for future generations. Awareness for prostate cancer is especially important since the disease has no symptoms until it has advanced. It will claim the lives of approximately 27,000 men this year. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer – the most common non-skin, male-specific cancer. Nearly three million men in the US are living with a prostate cancer diagnosis, and that number is estimated to reach four million by 2024 as baby boomers age. Wear Light Blue. www.prostatehealthguide.com

NOTE: Items provided on this website are for informational purposes only and are not an endorsement, medical, or legal advice. Consult your healthcare provider, event promoter, organization or institution where appropriate.

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