Ever think about who has to make those giant bows you see in commercials and in new car showrooms? They’re the specialty of a company in California. They supply the trademark bows you see in Lexus commercials, but they’ve produced the festive knots for a dozen other manufacturers, too.

Holiday sales are a vital part of the profitability of automobile manufacturers. The most visible push automakers put on occurs from roughly the Thanksgiving holiday through Presidents Day in February. Almost every automaker’s and dealership’s marketing plan falls back heavily on one image: Their newest models with a huge red holiday bow on top. As it turns out, those holiday bows have an interesting backstory.

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Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Over 145 Americans-family, friends, neighbors and colleagues, are diagnosed every day. The disease kills more people than breast cancer in the United States. We must rewrite the future of pancreatic cancer. Take action now to bring hope to the pancreatic cancer community by donating, raising funds or spreading awareness that of the major cancers, pancreatic cancer has the lowest survival rate.
Support such groups as the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network who work for improving survival from pancreatic cancer by 2020.
Together, we can bring greater focus on the disease across the country, and rewrite the future of pancreatic cancer through:
  • More public awareness and visibility
  • Accelerated research
  • Increased funding for patient services for people battling pancreatic cancer
  • Clinical trials that match patient needs
  • Higher clinical trial enrollment rate
  • Doctors delivering best practices
  • Better detection tools and treatment options for patients
  • Year-round government advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill to ensure federal research funding as a national priority
Display purple this month and Wage Hope today in the fight against pancreatic cancer.

What is a Gold Star family? It is the venerated status that no one wants, but accepts proudly to honor a loved one who paid the ultimate price to protect our Constitution and the many freedoms Americans have today.

For nearly 100 years, inclusion has been earned for losing an immediate family member serving during wartime. In 1928, 25 mothers who lost sons in World War I met in Washington to establish the American Gold Star Mothers organization. The Gold Star Wives organization was formed during World War II. The last Sunday of September is observed as Gold Star Mothers’ and Families’ Day. The day was first observed in 1936. In 1947, the US Congress passed a law authorizing and distributing Gold Star lapel pins for family members to wear. Gold Star families do not comprise a formal organization, but several organizations representing Gold Star family members emerged during the 20th century.

To date, 6,800 service members have lost their lives in Iraq and Afghanistan. Nearly 300,000 American service men and women are deployed in 150 countries around the world, many of them in harm’s way. Gold Star mothers and families and everyone else are encouraged to continue to tell the stories of the sacrifices their sons and daughters made, not just on Gold Star Mother’s Day, but every day of the year.

Gold Star Mother’s and Family’s Day is the last Sunday of September and Gold Star Spouses Day is April 5. The strength of our nation is our Army. The strength of our Army is our Soldiers. The strength of our Soldiers is our families. The Army recognizes that no one has given more for the nation than the families of the fallen. The families of service members who paid the ultimate sacrifice deserve our respect, gratitude and the very best support we can provide.  Help bring awareness to days and symbols that honor our Military heroes.

Atrial Fibrillation– Atrial fibrillation (also called afib) is an irregular heartbeat (or heart rhythm), and is a major cause of strokes. Having afib increases your stroke risk by 500 percent. In addition, afib can lead to heart failure, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Today, more than 5 million Americans have afib, and by 2030, it’s expected that as many as 17 million people will have it. About 350,000 hospitalizations a year in the U.S. are attributed to afib. In addition, people over the age of 40 have a one in four chance of developing afib in their lifetime. The good news is that by spreading the word about afib, we can wipe out afib-related strokes throughout the world. Wear Red. www.stopafib.org

Childhood Cancer– Every two minutes a child is diagnosed with cancer. The average age of a child diagnosed with cancer is 6. Childhood cancer is diagnosed in all ages, from newborn infants to children and young adults. In 80% of kids with cancer, the cancer has already spread to other areas of the body by the time it is diagnosed. That’s why so many children with cancer need to begin treatment right away. Much of what we know about treating adult cancers has been learned from childhood cancer research. Because of the treatments they had as kids, by the time they’re in their 30s or 40s, more than 95% of childhood cancer survivors will have a chronic health problem and 80% will have severe or life-threatening conditions. Wear Yellow. www.curesearch.org

Gynecological Cancer – Women are encouraged to learn more about the prevention and detection of gynecological cancers before they become fatal. It is estimated that there will be about  22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed annually. Wear Teal. www.ovarian.org; www.foundationforwomenscancer.org;

Hunger Action– This month, a nationwide network of food banks unite to urge individuals to take action in their communities. The goal is to mobilize the public to act on behalf of the over 48 million Americans facing hunger. As individuals, charities, businesses and governments, we all have a role to play in getting food to those in need. Take action in support of domestic hunger relief. Wear Orange. www.feedingamerica.org; www.nutritioncare.org/maw

National Childhood Obesity – Since the 1970s, the rate of obesity has tripled in children, threatening far-reaching long-term effects on their health. About 1 in 6 (17%) kids in the United States has obesity. This awareness month provides a chance for all of us to learn more about this serious health condition. While there is no simple solution, there are many ways communities can support youth with their journey to good health. Wear Yellow. www.cdc.gov

National Substance Abuse and Mental Health Recovery – This month, thousands of treatment and recovery programs around the country celebrate their successes and share them with their neighbors, friends, and colleagues to educate the public about treatment, how it works, for whom, and why. The campaign highlights the benefits of treatment for not only the affected individual, but for their family, friends, workplace, and society as a whole. Behavioral health is essential to overall health: prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover to live a healthy ad rewarding life. Wear Purple. www.samhsa.hhs.gov

National Prostate Cancer Awareness – Efforts to increase awareness of prostate cancer and bolster research will help save lives, and commitment to fathers, brothers and sons will contribute to a brighter tomorrow for future generations. Awareness for prostate cancer is especially important since the disease has no symptoms until it has advanced. It will claim the lives of approximately 27,000 men this year. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer – the most common non-skin, male-specific cancer. Nearly three million men in the US are living with a prostate cancer diagnosis, and that number is estimated to reach four million by 2024 as baby boomers age. Wear Light Blue. www.prostatehealthguide.com

NOTE: Items provided on this website are for informational purposes only and are not an endorsement, medical, or legal advice. Consult your healthcare provider, event promoter, organization or institution where appropriate.

     

COSTA MESA, CA. Like many families, one Southern California mother-daughter team knows over a dozen people who have had to deal with breast cancer. In fact, according to the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time during their life. The second most common cancer among women, breast cancer will kill more than 40,000 wives, daughters, mothers and sisters this year. That’s why raising awareness about prevention, detection, and treatments is vital for saving lives through action.

Jan Kingaard and Amber Hughes honor those lost to the disease as well as the survivors, advocates, and all those touched by cancer with their Cause Awareness Loops crafted at King Size Bows, Inc., in Costa Mesa, California. People throughout the country focus on several different issues each month to unite people to fight for a worthy cause. Every October, America pauses to raise awareness about breast cancer and encourages people to join in local and national events to reduce risk factors, fund groundbreaking research, and deliver healthcare to those who need it. King Size Bows’ wish is for people to make informed decisions about their health and show support to those facing the challenges of this devastating disease.

“Two of my cousins, my neighbor and a high school classmate are among many of the people in my life who have dealt with this,” Kingaard said. “Our company is owned and run by women, and one is a cancer survivor. Since our business is about celebrating life, we believe in inspiring like-minded individuals to unite together for a common cause.”

“King Size Bows was started in 2001 and has grown its line of health awareness bows to include Breast Cancer Awareness Loops in many sizes. Our largest so far is over 12 feet,” Hughes said. “We make them for indoor or outdoor use from 18 inches on up. Like anything, when the spotlight is on an issue or problem, it brings more attention to the cause, The fact that there is one month to shine the spotlight on breast cancer–which helps to boost the money raised–we want to be part of that.”

Traditionally, organizations, hospitals and individuals have wanted the light pink loops to display at walks, runs, hospitals and throughout cities. Now athletic teams, businesses and churches have added hot pink to their orders, putting them on trees, mailboxes, doors and stadiums.

Since its founding, King Size Bows has made a commitment to support charitable causes that promote the success and wellness of women and others through the power of information and relationships.

Government agencies, healthcare providers, private organizations, public charities, and research groups across the United States designate different days, weeks or months to raise awareness of an issue, commemorate a group or event, or celebrate something.

The objective of Awareness Months is to put a spotlight on mental, physical and social challenges that affect children, men, women, families and communities. Importantly, awareness and education help raise funds and support to understand, treat, control or end life-changing diagnosis or behaviors. This special attention improves lifestyles, advances cures, saves lives, implements programs, generates new discoveries, and unites people around worthy causes.

Campaigns and visual expressions of support focus towns, businesses, groups,
schools and individuals to make a commitment to find solutions for problems. No one should have to fight alone. You can make lives better and neighborhoods stronger by showing your support for a worthy cause.

For example, in SEPTEMBER:

National Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month
Childhood Cancer Awareness Month
National Food Safety Education Month
Blood Cancer Awareness Month
Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
National Sickle Cell Month
National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month
Newborn Screening Awareness Month
World Alzheimer’s Month
Sepsis Awareness Month
National Suicide Prevention Week (September 5-11)
World Sepsis Day (September 13)
National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month
National Preparedness Month
Pain Awareness Month
Sexual Health Awareness Month
Sports Eye Safety Month
National Celiac Disease Awareness Day
Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) Day
National HIV/AIDS Day
Malnutrition Awareness Week
National Women’s Health & Fitness Day
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Month